The state of New York is aggressive when it comes to shoplifting penalties. If you are accused of such, you may be facing serious criminal charges, whether it be large fees, extensive jail time, or even a permanent criminal record. Continue reading to understand what penalties you may be up against and how an experienced Spring Valley shoplifting attorney can work with you to reduce or eliminate them altogether.

What charges can I face for shoplifting in New York?

The state of New York recognizes shoplifting as a crime called larceny. Like most states, the severity of your charges will depend upon the dollar value of the item or items allegedly stolen. The consequences of shoplifting in New York are as follows:

  • Stolen property valued at up to $1,000 is known as petit larceny, and upon conviction, you will most likely face a Class A misdemeanor.
    • Fines up to $1,000.
    • Up to 1 year in jail.
  • Stolen property valued between $1,000 to $3,000 is grand larceny in the fourth degree, a Class E felony.
    • Fines up to $5,000 or double the offender’s gain from the crime.
    • Up to 4 years in jail.
  • Stolen property valued between $3,000 to $50,000 is grand larceny in the third degree, a Class D felony.
    • Up to 7 years in jail.
  • Stolen property valued between $50,000 to $1 million is grand larceny in the second degree, a Class C felony.
    • Up to 15 years in jail.
  • Stolen property valued over $1 million is grand larceny in the first degree, a Class B felony.
    • Up to 25 years in jail.

In some situations, individuals may qualify for a diversion program in place of incarceration.

What circumstances would lead to upgraded shoplifting charges?

If you commit larceny while also threatening to commit a crime of the first or second degree or while using force, you will be upgraded to a robbery charge. And if you use a weapon, you will be upgraded to armed robbery. If the weapon in use is stolen, this only heightens the potential penalties.

What defense can I take against my shoplifting charges?

A common defense is that of no criminal intent, which allows you to argue that you intended to pay for the item, didn’t realize that you were stealing the item, or thought you had implicit permission to take the item.

If this circumstance is applicable to you, contact a practiced Rockland County criminal defense attorney today to help you explore every legal avenue for your charges to be mitigated or dropped altogether.

CONTACT OUR EXPERIENCED ROCKLAND COUNTY FIRM

Kevin T. Conway has over 30 years of experience as a Spring Valley criminal attorney handling DUI, DWI, traffic violations, violent crimes, sex crimes, illegal gun possession, shoplifting, and juvenile crimes. Attorney Conway is also experienced in commercial law matters, zoning law, and estate planning. If you need a Rockland County criminal lawyer, contact our Spring Valley office for a free consultation.