Classifications for criminal attempts

One issue that a lot of people don’t realize is that they will be charged criminally for attempting to commit a crime even if they aren’t successful. There are still punishments for attempts to commit serious crimes. So, even if you don’t actually commit a crime that would result in a felony, you can still be charged with a felony.

If a person attempted to commit a crime, such as the criminal sale of a controlled substance in the first degree, or any other A-1 felony, they will still be charged with a Class A-1 felony. The same goes for attempting to commit a Class A-II felony. However, with less severe crimes, you will not always be charged the same. If you attempt to commit a class B felony but are unsuccessful, you will still be charged with a class C felony simply because you attempted. The rest of the attempt consequences are as follows:

  • If you tried to commit a Class C felony, you will be charged with a Class D felony
  • If you tried to commit a Class D felony, you will be charged with a Class E felony
  • If you tried to commit a Class E felony, you will be charged with a Class A misdemeanor
  • If you tried to commit a Class A misdemeanor, you will be charged with a Class B misdemeanor

It is important that you retain the services of an experienced criminal defense attorney after being charged with a crime of any sort.

Kevin T. Conway has over 30 years of experience as a Spring Valley criminal attorney handling DUI, DWI, traffic violations, violent crimes, sex crimes, illegal gun possession, shoplifting, and juvenile crimes. Attorney Conway is also experienced in commercial law matters, zoning law, and estate planning. If you need a Rockland County criminal lawyer, contact our Spring Valley office for a free consultation.